Border chaos Slovenia: North German owner on the way to his yacht in Koper/Slovenia turned away at border

Grenzchaos Slowenien
Sloweniens Marinas waren nur drei Tage erreichbar, danach hat das Land die Grenzen für ausländische Yachteigner (auch EU) wieder geschlossen.
Slovenia is considered a good example of how it is better not to implement loosening of entry requirements. First, the young EU member declared the pandemic emergency caused by COVID-19 to be virtually over by decree, allowing unrestricted entry and transit. However, after no agreement was apparently reached at EU level, the borders were closed again for EU citizens, with the exception of Croats. And the possession of a ship with a berth in one of the Slovenian marinas is no longer considered a "valid reason" for entry.

Transit yes – entry and stay in Slovenia no

The SeaHelp update is still valid: According to the staff member of the Slovenian embassy in Berlin, the following publication is not correct: “In addition, German citizens residing in an EU member state or in a Schengen state will also be able to enter Slovenia and transit through Slovenia, but only after the list of states has been published by the Slovenian government according to § 9 paragraph 5 of the above-mentioned (consolidated) regulations and Germany has been included in the list of states. However, no information about this has been available so far. According to the embassy staff member, transit is always permitted if entry into Croatia is guaranteed. We hope to have provided clarity in this regard.

Mail from SeaHelp member

The following mail reached us on May 20th from a member (name known to the editors) who used the open slot to travel to his yacht:

I have just read your article about Slovenia: https://www.sea-help.eu/en/news-general/quarantaene-entry-retour-croatia-germany-austria/ and would like to point out that the Slovenian government has withdrawn this regulation after less than 3 days. The border is closed again! Instead of the previous 7-day quarantine there is now a 14-day quarantine!

Next: Today I spoke with the Slovenian border police in Lazaret (Koper). Also for boat owners there are no exceptions. The list of exceptions is only the following (source: Ljubljana Foreign Trade Office and Slovenian Embassy in Vienna):

“Persons having their main or secondary residence in the EU or the Schengen area – and thus also in Austria – must spend 14 days in quarantine after entry, the details being determined by the health authorities in each individual case.

Exceptions apply to:

  • Day- and week commuters with an employment contract in the respective other country or persons who can identify themselves as such,
  • Freight transport,
  • Farmers with agricultural land in the other country,
  • Use of a medical service in the neighbouring country,
  • Participation in the funeral of a close relative, if entry and exit are on the same day,
  • pupils and students and their parents who bring or pick them up within one day to the educational institution in the neighbouring country”.

Me and three other Austrians slipped through this short, open time slot and onto our yachts. For all other sailors Slovenia is closed again / further on. In addition, the 14-day quarantine on return journey (for Austrians) and the obligation for transit passengers to pass through non-stop still applies in Austria.

North German yacht owner had to turn back

Yesterday I was informed by my mechanic here that a North German owner was not allowed to enter the country to take over his yacht in Koper. He was turned away at the SLO border and had to return to Germany (non stop through Austria. Not even a hotel room is available in Austria before 29 May).

Maybe you make an info-update so that an owner doesn’t have to travel from far away to Slovenia full of hope and then be turned away or be quarantined for 14 days.
Best regards from Izola

Thank you very much from SeaHelp. Such reports about the conditions on the ground are certainly extremely helpful to all members. However, it also shows the consequences that the unpredictable changes in the regulations for entering Slovenia will have for individual boat owners. Being turned away at the border after more than 1000 kilometers of driving is not necessarily what hospitality is all about.

SeaHelp itself would like to ask all travelers to use this opportunity to tell us about their experiences on the spot and to send us photos and written information. We will be happy to publish them after they have been viewed, if they could be relevant to other members.

Further links:

German Embassy Ljubljana (Ljubljana)
Slovenian Tourist Board
German-Slovenian Chamber of Industry and Commerce (AHK Slovenia)

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